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Oberyn Nymeros Martell, Tyrion muttered under his breath as he fell in beside the man. The Red Viper of Dorne. And what in the seven hells am I supposed to do with him? He knew the man only by reputation, to be sure… but the reputation was fearsome. When he was no more than sixteen, Prince Oberyn had been found abed with the paramour of old Lord Yronwood, a huge man of fierce repute and short temper. A duel ensued, though in view of the prince’s youth and high birth, it was only to first blood. Both men took cuts, and honor was satisfied. Yet Prince Oberyn soon recovered, while Lord Yronwood’s wounds festered and killed him. Afterward men whispered that Oberyn had fought with a poisoned sword, and ever thereafter friends and foes alike called him the Red Viper. 


"One letter I got was from a woman, a waitress. She wrote me: “I work hard all day, I’m divorced, I have a couple of children. My life is very hard, and my one pleasure is I come home and I read fantasy, and I escape to other worlds. Then I read your book, and God, it was fucking horrifying. I don’t read for this. This is a nightmare. Why would you do this to me?” That letter actually reached me. I wrote her back and basically said, “I’m sorry; I do understand where you’re coming from.” Some people do read . . . I don’t like to use the word escape, because escapism has such a pejorative aspect, but it takes you to another world. Maybe it is escape. Reading fiction has helped me through some bad times in my own life. The night my father died, I was in Michigan and I got word from my mother. I couldn’t get to a plane until the next day, so I sat around thinking about my father, the good and the bad in our relationship. I remember I opened whatever book I was reading, and for a few hours, I was able to stop thinking about my father’s death. It was a relief. There are some people who read and want to believe in a world where the good guys win and the bad guys lose, and at the end they live happily ever after. That’s not the kind of fiction that I write. Tolkien was not that. The scouring of the Shire proved that. Frodo’s sadness – that was a bittersweet ending, which to my mind was far more powerful than the ending of Star Wars, where all the happy Ewoks are jumping around, and the ghosts of all the dead people appear, waving happily [laughs]. But I understand where the other people are coming from. There are a lot of books out there. Let everyone find the kind of book that speaks to them, and speaks to what they need emotionally."
— George R.R. Martin on fiction, escapism, and finding works that speak to you, in an interview with Rolling Stone, April 23, 2014 (x)

“You told me that life was not a song. That I would learn that one day, to my sorrow.” She felt tears in her eyes, but whether she wept for Ser Dontos Hollard, for Joff, for Tyrion, or for herself, Sansa could not say. “Is it all lies, forever and ever, everyone and everything?”


Go home, child. You have a home, which is more than many can say in these dark days.


make me choose

lillee-cauls asked:  Cersei Lannister or Catelyn Stark?


I hate when I’m on mobile and I’m just scrolling and forget I was on someone’s blog and not my dash and I probably reblog something from 6 months ago and they’re like wtf how?


jamescookjr:

The Lion and The Rose.


morganapendragons:

Make Me Choose
∟ sicktodeathoflogic asked: Brienne or Jaime


koffrey:

Many who follow entertainment in Hollywood will have a tough time wrapping their head around you–

Deal with it. [x]


gimpyhair:

You have seen Gwen’s FABULOUS “Im in love with someone”, right?

http://thepotteralliance.tumblr.com/post/83143026677/im-in-love-with-someone-dave-pop-this-is-a

what is happening here


joffri:

bOOK DAARIO IS. OUT OF CONTROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOLLLL


I contemplate the moment in the garden, the idea of allowing your own crucifixion.


ladyoftheshieldarm:

Aragorn being done with everyone’s shit


See you in another life, brother


The flowergirl & The soldier